2014 Software Test Luminary Award Nominees

2014 Software Test Luminary
We are pleased to announce the nominees for the 5th Annual STP Luminary Award!

It has been five years since we asked the software testing community to consider just what it is that designates a person to be a luminary in their field. Those qualities were used to define our candidates for the annual luminary award:

A luminary is someone who has inspired others by their actions and the results of those actions on the profession. It is not a popularity contest, although many luminaries do become popular. It is about the way they have given back, and shared their knowledge and experience with others in order to advance the profession and improve the career paths of the practitioners. A luminary will typically be recognized and respected long after their days of practicing have ended.

This description continues to be relevant today. Our distinguished roster of luminary award recipients for prior years is as follows:

Our current year nominees were selected by our previous luminary award winners and now we are asking our testing community to vote for the 2014 STP Luminary Award Recipient. Following are the four nominees selected along with some information for you to consider as you vote for that person who has inspired you in your career as a software tester. Any member of the community can evaluate each of the candidates and place a vote for the person they consider most deserving of this award based on the definition of a luminary.

 

2014 Software Test Luminary

James BachThirty-one years ago James Bach was a high school dropout working as a video game programmer, writing in Assembler for the Commodore 64 and Apple II. A few years later his “big break” came when he was hired to manage a test team at Apple Computer. He’s been hooked on testing ever since. He spent nearly a decade as a test manager in Silicon Valley during the 90’s, and became well known for rethinking software testing to give it a grounding in social science and general systems thinking. His work and overall approach have been much influenced by Cem Kaner and Jerry Weinberg.

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Michael BoltonMichael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software expertly and credibly in uncertain conditions and under extreme time pressure. Michael has 25 years of experience testing, developing, managing, and writing about software. For the last 15 years, he has led DevelopSense, a Toronto-based testing and development consultancy. Prior to that, he was with Quarterdeck Corporation for eight years, during which he managed the company’s flagship products and directed project and testing teams both in-house and around the world.

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Rob SabourinRob Sabourin has more than thirty years of management experience, leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Rob has managed, trained, mentored, and coached thousands of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. The author of I am a Bug!, the popular software testing children’s book, Rob is an adjunct professor of Software Engineering at McGill University.

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John von Newman

Although I have never met John von Neumann, he influenced my testing work more than any other individual. I can’t think of anybody who comes close to von Neumann’s luminosity.” – Jerry Weinberg – 2010 Software Test Luminary Award Recipient

John von Neumann – December 28, 1903 – February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian and American pure and applied mathematician, physicist, inventor and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields, including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and fluid dynamics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics. He was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics, in the development of functional analysis, a principal member of the Manhattan Project and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (as one of the few originally appointed), and a key figure in the development of game theory and the concepts of cellular automata, the universal constructor, and the digital computer.

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2013 Software Test Luminary